Work in the vineyard

Work in the vineyard

Pruning, attachment to trellis wires, ploughing, green harvesting and trimming are all crucial for optimum growth and the selection of the best berries. This magnificent heritage is also carefully preserved. Each year, dead or accidentally damaged vines are replaced with young plants. This technique is called "complantation" and accounts for about 2% of the vine plants every year. It helps to maintain the potential quality and yields of the plots. In these plots, the young plants are tagged and harvested separately so that they do not affect the potential of the older vines. Sometimes, when the average age of the vines in a plot is too high or too varied, a complete uprooting and replanting becomes necessary. After uprooting, the soil is left to rest for five years to enable it to completely restructure and regenerate itself. For several years now, the estate has been developing innovative techniques to protect the vines and maintain the soil while at the same time respecting the environment and carefully managing any products that are used. This strategy requires a detailed assessment of any potential threats to the vines (establishment of the numbers of predators, analysis of disease cycles etc.) to enable a sustainable viticulture approach. It also uses organic methods of crop protection (insect colonization, mating disruption, etc.) and products that are neutral for the environment. Similarly, no herbicides are used to maintain the soil and only organic fertilizers, combined with composted vine cuttings, plant matter and manure are used to feed the soil. Ploughing with horses was reintroduced in 2008 for a greater respect of the soil, less compaction and an improved carbon footprint. This approach was enabled through the deep commitment of the vineyard workers who have gradually been trained in these techniques, creating a unique harmony and a very special atmosphere that unites humans, animals and the Earth. Horses are also being tried for other vineyard tasks (spraying and trimming). Finally, new biodynamic practices have been adopted for ten hectares of the Enclos: • Treatments are carried out for each plot and vintage with very low doses of copper supplemented with plant -based liquid fertilizers • Tasks are scheduled in accordance with the lunar calendar Human intervention thereby aims to encourage biodiversity in the vineyard and strengthen the vines' natural defences. This approach is likely to be applied to a larger area of the vineyard. It aims to develop our understanding and awareness of the balance that exists between the vines, the soil and the environment with a view to obtaining the best possible expression of the terroir in the wines.